How to Install GSM Repeater

Mobile technology has opened a lot of doors for communication in places that weren’t always possible. Today, you can use your cell phone just about anywhere. For this reason, it can be even more frustrating when you experience a weak signal in your home or office. The best solution for this problem is to install a GSM repeater in the area where you are experiencing low reception. What is a GSM Repeater? A low signal can be caused by a variety of conditions, such as interference, thick walls or other obstructive structures, or the distance from the cell tower. Since cell phones operate by transmitting radio waves from one base station to the mobile unit, the GSM repeater acts as a middle receiver, in which the signal is amplified before being sent to the cell phone.

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Forget about Weak Signal with Mobile Phone Signal Booster

Have you ever had the situation in the office when you desperately needed to call your client and agree on a deal, but your mobile phone kept breaking, saying that there was no connection? The Old Story of the Old World The story of people complaining that their mobile phone is always out of coverage is not new and quite typical worldwide. This very problem is rather painful for workers whose work efficiency depends on calls. Unfortunately, it can be a typical problem of many multistoried buildings, where most office plankton works.

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Arduino and Matlab scope project

Oscilloscope is quite a universal instrument which I would recommend to invest first. Normal bench scope does the job pretty well. I am not a big fan of DIY scopes that are built of microcontroller and LCD or interfaced to PC via the serial interface. You will never get decent sampling and functionality with low-end parts. But in other hand, building such scope can be fun and be a good choice for student projects. prem_ranjan shares his Arduino-based scope project, where he outputs waveform to MATLAB plots. The investment into this project is minimal. O course you could capture signal directly to Arduino analog pin, but op-amp based signal conditioning could make life easier. In the end, here are few features of this scope:

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Multichannel ADC using DMA on STM32

Previously we have tried to do a single conversion of one ADC channel. We were waiting for the ADC result in a loop, which isn’t an effective way of using processor resources. It is better to trigger a conversion and wait for the conversion to complete the interrupt. This way, a processor can do other tasks rather than wait for ADC conversion to complete. This time we will go through another example to set up more than one channel and read ADC values using interrupt service routine. How does multichannel ADC conversion works? If we need to convert several channels continuously, we need to set up Sequence registers (ADC_SQRx). There are three sequence registers: ADC_SQR1, ADC_SQR2, and ADC_SQR3 where we can set up a maximum of 16 channels in any order. Conversion sequence starts with SQ1[4:0] settings in ADC_SQR3 register. Bits [4:0] hold the number of ADC channels.

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Introduction to MSP430 Interrupts

In this tutorial, we will see a practical way of coding interrupts. Our task for today will be to learn interrupts for GPIO and Timers. In the initial part, we will first look at coding interrupts for the GPIO pins, and in the other half, we will modify this code to add interrupts for timers. By the end of the tutorial, you will have a code that will blink a led using a timer interrupt. However, the blinking frequency will vary if you push a button. In the last tutorial on timers, we saw that we were continuously monitoring the timer flag to check when the timer has overflown. This process is called polling. The only problem with this method is it keeps the processor busy. What if we had another way by which the timer would itself tell the CPU that the timer had overflown? This is where interrupts come into the picture. For example, imagine a scenario where you would always go up to the door to see someone s there or not. This process can be called…

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Use fixed integer types to enhance portability

If you have programmed anything with C, you should be familiar with common data types like char, unsigned char, int, unsigned int, long int, long long int, etc. It is tough to tell by the looks of the type how many bytes this variable takes on memory and how it looks in a different system. For instance, in 8-bit AVR-GCC compiler, int is a 16-bit type, while in ARM-GCC, int is 32-bit. So int size is dependent on platform, compiler, and runtime libraries. And switching between systems may trick you if you are not careful enough. You can always check the size of the variable by using sizeof() function. What to do if you need your code to be portable between different systems. Some great libraries could work on any system, including 8-bit, 16-bit, 32-bit, or 64-bit. To avoid this annoying problem, the ISO C99 standard introduced portable data types that are defined in stdint.h header file. If you open this header file of your default compiler tool-set you will find how things are organized. First of all, it checks…

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